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Prostate Cancer
Treatment Guide™

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
Therapy News View Procedures Share Your Experience

Cryosurgery &
Cryotherapy

Prostate Cryotherapy

Also called cryosurgery, this minimally invasive procedure uses needles to apply freezing gases to the prostate. Prostate Cryotherapy

Also called cryosurgery, this minimally invasive procedure uses needles to apply freezing gases to the prostate.

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Cryosurgery Patients

Cryosurgery is used for patients with localized cancer, external radiation recurrent cancer, Gleason scores under 6, or PSA levels under 10. Cryosurgery Patients

Cryosurgery is used for patients with localized cancer, external radiation recurrent cancer, Gleason scores under 6, or PSA levels under 10.

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Minimally Invasive Surgery

Cryosurgery takes about 2 hours with a possible overnight admission. Minimally Invasive
Surgery

Cryosurgery takes about 2 hours with a possible overnight admission.

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Cryosurgery
Survival Rates

Long-term clinical results are limited but promising. Cryosurgery
Survival Rates

Long-term clinical results are limited but promising.

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Cryosurgery
Side Effects

Side effects may include moderate pelvic pain, blood in urine, scrotal swelling, mild urinary urgency, and impotence. Cryosurgery
Side Effects

Side effects may include moderate pelvic pain, blood in urine, scrotal swelling, mild urinary urgency, and impotence.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy.

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Cryosurgery &
Cryotherapy Videos

Click here to view Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy procedures. Cryosurgery &
Cryotherapy Videos

Click here to view Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy procedures.

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Cryosurgery &
Cryotherapy Experience


Click here to share your Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy experiences.Cryosurgery &
Cryotherapy Experience

Click here to share your Cryosurgery & Cryotherapy experiences.

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Hormone
Therapy

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostate Cancer Cryotherapy:
Impotence Side Effects

Prostate cancer treatments can result in impotence, which is the inability to obtain and sustain an erection satisfactory of sexual intercourse. Impotence after prostate cancer cryotherapy depends on a number of factors, including the patient's age, his current sexual functioning, and the location and stage of his disease. Younger men, who were able to have intercourse without a pharmaceutical aid such as sildenafil or a similar drug prior to treatment, are more likely to retain sexual function after undergoing cryosurgery.

Prostate cancer patients should not expect to be able to perform sexually in the days or even weeks after receiving treatment. Because the body has just undergone a medical procedure, sexual function may be affected and may return to normal as the body heals from the procedure.

What is the Relationship Between Prostate Cancer and Impotence?
The nerves that cause erections are called the neurovascular nerve bundles. These nerve bundles sit on either side of the prostate gland. To ensure the destruction of all the cancerous cells, surgeons freeze and thaw the entire gland including these nerve bundles. Without the nerves, the brain is unable to trigger the chemical and physiological reactions that cause erection. Additionally, the destruction of the prostate gland and some of the surrounding tissues can damage or divert the flow of blood to the penis.

The neurovascular nerve bundles, however, are able to regenerate. Some of the men who reported impotence in the months following prostate cancer cryosurgery were eventually able to maintain erections without assistance from medical devices or pharmaceutical drugs.

Nerve-Sparing Prostate Cancer Cryotherapy
Some doctors are beginning to investigate the effectiveness of focused cryotherapy, during which they selectively target the cancerous sections of the prostate to spare one or both nerve bundles. This procedure is called unilateral or bilateral nerve-sparing cryotherapy, similar in the concept to the nerve-sparing prostatectomy.

Coping with Impotence after Cryoablation
Speak to your doctor about impotence side effects, especially if you have not yet undergone treatment. To learn about the physiological and chemical reactions that cause erections, please click here. Listed below are some of the common therapies for impotence:

Sex Therapy after Prostate Cancer Treatment
After undergoing treatment, some men may experience impotence as a result of the stress associated with the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Sex therapy is a worthwhile option for many couples, as it encourages communication, intimacy, and human contact, all of which can contribute to sexual confidence of the individual and a more gratifying experience for both partners.

Impotence Medications: Pills and Suppositories
Sildenafil, tadalafil, and varendafil have all received large amounts of media attention. These drugs are known as PDE-5 inhibitors and work to prevent a naturally-occurring chemical from contributing to a loss of erection. Medications are available in other forms such as urethral suppositories and penile injections which cause erections by relaxing the smooth arterial muscle of the penis and allow blood to flow in. Speak to your doctor about possible side effects and which medication can help you.

Medical Devices and Surgical Implants
Some patients who cannot rely on pharmaceutical treatment may consider exploring medical devices. Vacuum erection devices draw blood into the chambers of the penis. Additionally, there are surgical options. Implants, both mechanical and semi-rigid may be options for some men.

To read about coping with impotence, please click here or speak to your doctor about a therapy that may be right for you.

 

 
 
 
 

 
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