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Prostate Cancer
Treatment Guide™

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
Therapy News View Procedures Share Your Experience

Hormone
Therapy

Prostate Hormone Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth. Prostate Hormone
Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth.

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Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment. Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment.

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Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection. Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection.

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Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments. Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments.

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Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use. Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.

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Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures. Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures.

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Hormone Therapy
Experiences


Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.Hormone Therapy
Experiences

Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy – LHRH Agonist

Prostate cancer hormone therapy treatment may use LHRH agonists, also known as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists or gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone are essentially the same chemicals which are released by the hypothalamus when it detects lowering levels of testosterone.

An agonist is a chemical that mimics a naturally-occurring substance in the body and produces the same physiological effect. The agonist, therefore, will occupy the cell receptors of the chemical it is mimicking. An agonist has a longer biological half-life, meaning the body takes longer to metabolize and eliminate the agonist. The agonist therefore will occupy a receptor for a longer period of time. Agonists are sometimes referred to as analogues because they are inserted beneath the skin where they continuously emit LHRH agonist of GnRH agonist for a prostate cancer treatment. LHRH and GnRH agonists are also administered as an injection that can be performed in a doctor’s office or at home.

The LHRH agonist mimics normal LHRH and fills the receptors of the pituitary gland that receive normal LHRH. For a period of 7 to 10 days, the pituitary gland perceives the LHRH agonist as normal LHRH and causes the testicles to produce large amounts of testosterone. This sudden rise of testosterone is known as “hormone flare” or “tumor flare,” which may be painful and possibly dangerous to patients with advanced prostate cancer bone metastasis. After 7 to 10 days, the LHRH agonist still occupies the pituitary gland’s receptors, whereas normal LHRH would have been metabolized. The pituitary gland stops telling the testicles to make testosterone. The level of hormone then drops by 90 to 95 percent, which is castration level. Use of LHRH agonists is known as chemical or medical castration.

The LHRH agonists drugs include leuprolide, goserelin, and triptorelin. These drugs are also sometimes used to treat women’s health problems including breast cancer. Leuprolide and goserelin are available in the United States in both analogue and injection form. Goserelin uses implants which are injected under the skin of the upper right abdomen every 28 days or every twelve weeks. Goserelin can be injected daily, once per month, once per 3 months, once per 4 months, and once per 12 months. Leuprolide comes with patient instructions, so the administration of the hormone therapy can be done at home. Patients who receive hormone therapy daily are encouraged to receive injections around the same time every day, and patients who receive their injections after longer periods of time, are encouraged to have their injections around the same time at the end of their hormone therapy cycle. If a patient misses a daily dose, they should receive the injection as soon as possible.

Patients who have hormone therapy kits in their homes must dispose of the needles properly. Patients are also reminded that they are to use only the needles provided with the kit because a different needle could alter the dosage. Patients should keep hormone therapy out of children’s reach and prevent freezing, direct sunlight, and heat from possibly altering the drug’s effectiveness.

Patients who have questions about their treatment should not hesitate to speak with their doctors or with a qualified prostate cancer nursing specialist.

 
 
 
 

 
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